urban sprawl

I made this quilt towards the end of last year but I don’t think I have shown it on here before. I call it Urban Sprawl and it is of my own design.

Karen Mundt-  Urban Sprawl

Karen Mundt- Urban Sprawl


I made it in the improv style; starting with lots of little pieces cut and joined in all manner of ways. It was fun to just play and experiment with putting together building blocks which were then joined with others to gradually make larger pieces of the quilt top.
Karen Mundt

Karen Mundt


I had always wanted to make a quilt that was mainly white, or off-white, and little pops of colour. My preference has always been for pieced quilts, so I pieced together wonky flying geese blocks, inserted narrow strips here and there, deliberately didn’t line things up and eschewed the use of a ruler in most cases.
sprawl-a
sprawl-b
The main theme I had in mind was a play on a cityscape. There are narrow buildings and structures in amongst rooflines of houses.
sprawl-c
Probably the hardest part was actually putting it all together at the end; making the pieces fit together with odd-shaped coping, or sashing, strips to put some order into it all. This is where a design wall comes in handy!
sprawl-d
I backed it with a white backing and faced it, instead of binding. I quilted it with straight and angled lines, some of which echoed the house and building shapes.
sprawl-e
If you are in Brisbane between 27 to 29 April, go along to a quilt display being held by Queensland Quilters, called Quilt Connect. This quilt will be hanging there, along with the quilts of 4 others from my local quilt group, and many others from groups across Queensland, all affiliated with Queensland Quilters. The details are:

QuiltConnect

Mt Gravatt Show Grounds

1644 Logan Rd Mt Gravatt

(best entrance via Broadwater Rd)

Thurs 27 to Sat 29 April 2017.

Karen Mundt

Karen Mundt

building scraps

I’ve been playing with scraps lately. Cutting up lots of pieces and sewing them back together, as we do. I started making these pieces of improvisation a couple of months ago, just constructing blocks of no particular size or shape and no design in mind.
improv4
When I got them back out again this weekend I put up on a board the bits I had already made, to get some ideas on how I want them to all be joined up together.
improv3
A very favourite theme of mine is cityscapes, so it’s not surprising that I finally decided on building a quilt around that idea- a view of a city in a sort-of deconstructed way. I have some lop-sided flying geese blocks, triangles and log cabin blocks which when put together resemble houses and buildings. I like that idea, and I’m on my way!
improv2
improv1
improv5
I am using lots of white with pops of colour, some greens and blues, a little purple and brown spots. I want it to be a ‘modern’ style quilt, so the aim is to have lots of negative space.
I’ve also made this month’s blocks for the Cherish do.Good.Stitches charity quilt that I contribute to: these are the Delectable Mountain block, or sometimes known by a few different names like Mountain Majesties, in black, grey and white:
KarenM-August1
KarenM-August2
I’m off to put them in the post!

a workshop

I went to a quilting workshop recently. We all had to take our sewing machines, our irons and ironing boards, a cutting board…
K1
a random pick of fabrics, including old blocks left from previous projects and sewing tools, but no rulers.
wshop1
k3
The day was spent playing with fabric, making free-form cuts in fabric and adding them to any other bits of fabric that your hand might fall on.
I decided to use a lighter colour scheme than I usually work with- some creams, whites, browns and muted colours. These blocks I’m showing here haven’t been trimmed yet.
K4
k5
I also took some old blocks left from a previous project and split them up, then added some slivers of hand-dyed colour.
K6
K2
Our tutor, Peggy Phelps, started us off with some ideas of blocks to start with using lots of techniques such as strip-piecing, wonky flying geese, chequerboard units and uneven log cabin blocks.
wshop3
A few workshop participants took a little time to get used to ‘not being neat’ but soon got into the swing of it!
wshop5
And Peggy showed us some of her quilts where she has used lots of lovely bright colour!

Peggy Phelps

Peggy Phelps


Peggy Phelps

Peggy Phelps


Cornelia's blocks

Cornelia’s blocks


Alison

Alison


Meryl

Meryl


Marilyn

Marilyn


I find that any workshop you can do is worth spending the time to do it- there’s always something you pick up along the way- whether it be a new technique or even some inspiration to try something different of your own.

my small world quilt

I started this art quilt last year. My Small World Quilt is made from a pattern by Jane Kingwell, and was featured in the Quiltmania magazine.

Karen Mundt- My Small World

Karen Mundt- My Small World


It combines my loves of lots of different fabrics- the ‘scrappy look’- with the theme of buildings and houses. Of course, how you choose what fabrics to use is entirely an individual choice. At the time there was an online Quilt-Along and accompanying Instagram groups, so it was fun to check them out to see how others interpreted it.
msw7
I used only fabrics that I already had, and it was a chance to use some different little bits and pieces. Like this little doggy…
msw4
and this little girl at the window…
msw5
I used light low-volume fabrics for the sky area, some with text, some with spots or self-patterns. I started with some pale blues and pinks close to the skyline, fading them to lighter colours as it went higher.
msw6
msw8
I also made one little change. In place of the little Pisa tower block, I instead added in a little hand-embroidered block of the Statue of Liberty. That was to reflect my trip to the States, taken during the time I was making it.
It also took me a long time to decide on how to quilt it. I actually put the needle in at an arbitrary place, grabbed the ruler and decided to quilt first one line, then another, turned that into a diamond. Echoed that, did another diamond further across, repeat. That was for the top half- the sky. When I got to the lower half, I just quilted all over in an irregular grid about 2 inches apart.
msw2
I backed it with a white and brown stripe, which I also used for the binding.
msw3
I really enjoyed making this quilt. With all the different blocks and fabric choices to make, you don’t get bored with it and its fun to see what the next section will look like! I enjoyed it so much, I may even make another version some day!
Karen Mundt- My Small World

Karen Mundt- My Small World

creating with bias strips

This mini quilt top was created by using bias strips- brightly coloured strips on texty backgrounds.

Karen Mundt- Symbols

Karen Mundt- Symbols


I used one of those little bias maker tools, where you feed in the strips of fabric cut on the bias and it turns over the edges so you can iron them down as it comes out the other end. Do you have one of those sitting in your drawer, not used for a long time, like me?!

I joined the Mighty Lucky club which is going to highlight some new methods and techniques each month. I thought it would be good to get me thinking about new things and to just have a play. The first month was about using bias strips to create a modern quilt.
bias3
For some reason these symbols popped into my head so I decided to try and make a few of them. I used a 3/4″ strip because I thought I would need it to be a bit on the thinner side to get it to curve how I needed.
bias4
However in retrospect I think wider strips might have looked a bit better- the symbols look a bit ‘spindly’ to my eyes- what do you think? I’m not over-pleased with it, but it’s okay!

It was fairly easy to do- I arranged the strips into the shapes and then used some glue to hold them in place while I sewed them down by machine. Using the Edgestitch foot (#10C on my Bernina) made that easy.
bias1
The instructions that were given included the use of iron-on adhesive which I didn’t have any of, so the Roxanne glue did a good job instead. I used a monofilament thread but of course you can use any coloured threads to make the stitching a feature.
Not sure what I will do with this now though- it may even end up being slashed and re-assembled for another modern quilt along the way!

it’s a small world..

I’ve been working away on the ‘My Small World’ quilt (pattern by Jen Kingwell), also following the quiltalong hosted by Very Kerry Berry, among others. In Part 5, there is a lot of work in some paper piecing and applique. One section is a half-moon, or maybe half sun?- shape made up of hexagons. There are 30 little hexagons about 1/2 inch.
2015-09-01 22.25.34
I haven’t done much with hexagons in the past, so I was eager to try them out, especially as they would all be in colourful scraps and nothing matching- my favourite! Here they are joined together, along with the smallest foundation-pieced triangle arc below it.
MSWQP5-1
I think some more hexies might be in my future! I love seeing them all pieced, especially using all different colours as I have, and they are quite quick to put together.
This pattern doesn’t give a lot of detailed instructions on the various sections, so you are open to using your own favourite methods for constructing the components. For the pieced arcs, template shapes for the triangles are given, with the intention being that you trace lots of little triangles and then piece them together. To me, these arcs looked like the arcs in a New York Beauty block, which is my most favourite block, so I decided to construct the arcs using foundation paper piecing. This is the picture from the pattern just to show what we are aiming at:

Jen Kingwell's My Small World Quilt

Jen Kingwell’s My Small World Quilt


I just had to work out the size of the arcs by looking at the pictures given on how many of the one-inch squares it covers. As you can see, the little hexie component partly covers one edge of the pieced arcs anyway, so it doesn’t matter if the final component isn’t the exact size that is in the original pattern. I drew them on graph paper first, then traced those onto paper to use for piecing.
MSWQ-P5-arcs
From there it was just piecing the fabric scraps together as I would a NY Beauty arc, sewing along the lines and getting nice sharp points.
MSWQ-P5-arcs2
That’s the first arc, another few to go!

blogger’s quilt festival

It’s the time of the year when the Blogger’s Quilt Festival is on over at Amy’s Creative Side blog. It’s a quilt festival for those who can’t get to the festivals in person, instead you can tour around the blogs of all the entrants looking at their amazing quilts. There are also opportunities for prizes so don’t forget to take a look.
I have entered two quilts. The first is this Lollipop Trees quilt, made to the pattern of Kim McLean and using mainly Kaffe Fassett fabrics.

Karen Mundt-Lollipop Trees

Karen Mundt-Lollipop Trees


I first showed the quilt here.
I’m entering it in the applique section. It was a big quilt for me to make and the most applique I had ever done on a quilt.
lolly5
lolly4
My second entry is going in to the Modern category. It’s this quilt I made using one of the score’s from Sherri Lyn Wood’s Improvisational Quilts Handbook, shown on the blog here.
9patch1
I started with a flying geese block and experimented and improvised, using hand-dyed fabrics and stripes and raw-edged piecing.
9patch7
I’m not sure what exactly is modern- is anyone?! But it fits the commonly-accepted criteria, so that’s what I’m going with!
KarenMundt1

a modern DWR on the long-arm

I recently quilted this quilt-top for a friend.
barb-1
She had made it as a wedding gift, using the pattern Metro Rings by Sew Kind of Wonderful.
It’s a modern take on the double wedding ring quilt pattern. Barb made it in blue, red and purple Kaffe Fassett fabrics with a white background, and she requested I quilt it as was modelled on the pattern.
barb-4
She made a lovely quilt and it was a little daunting for me to quilt it!- a fairly concentrated quilting design necessitating lots of measuring and straight line work as well as curved lines, using various rulers.
barb-2
This is the back- Barb used a pale batik fabric for the backing fabric.
barb-3
barb-6
When it was finished, I was very happy and a little relieved it turned out so well.
barb-5
Thank you Barb for allowing me to do your quilting!

blue birds- a tessellating pattern

This little quilt was made as my response to this month’s art quilt challenge with my local group, Gatton Quilters. Each month we are creating a quilt using only one colour, and as you can see this month it was blue!

Blue Birds- Karen Mundt

Blue Birds- Karen Mundt


Using only one colour can be quite a challenge. You need to create something that is appealing, still shows pattern and texture, variety, shade – all while not having a variety of colours at your disposal. I took the opportunity to try out something that had been stirring around in my mind for awhile.
I’m interested in tessellating patterns- where a repetitive shape can cover a surface without any gaps or overlapping. I had a play with some graph paper and drew up a bird shape. To see the bird shapes would require different fabrics or colours or darks/lights to distinguish between each bird.
I want to eventually make a large quilt using this pattern but saw this challenge as a way of practising it, or a trial run if you like.
birds4
Because this quilt only had to be 14″ square, the size of the individual squares had to be small enough to create a number of birds across the surface. I decided on each square measuring 3/4″ (finished) and was able to create the pattern using whole squares and half-square triangles.
birds5
I had some beautiful Reece Scannell shot cottons in a variety of blues which were ideal for this. These cottons are lovely and soft and their colours so lovely to look at in different lights or angles.
Blue Birds- Karen Mundt

Blue Birds- Karen Mundt


This is only the top finished at this stage. I’m thinking of adding a mitred border to finish it off.
Blue Birds- Karen Mundt

Blue Birds- Karen Mundt


Dear Jane quilt block: this is F12 Starburst (although it looks different to the one in the book!- I think I made the original design on point. Oh well, you wouldn’t have known if I didn’t tell you, right?!
F12

F12


Linking up to ‘WIP Wednesday’ on the Freshly Pieced blog.

how to… make a pineapple quilt block

Do you ever get an idea in your mind that you can’t get rid of- until you actually do something about it? I’ve been thinking about pineapple quilts lately. There seems to be a few on websites and Instagram and I’ve becme curious. I think they appeal to me because they are a block for a pieced quilt, as against an applique quilt. And my over-all favourite type of quilt is one with lots of pieces which allow you to play with different fabrics and placements and variations.
So today I had to scratch that itch and try one out. This is my finished block:

LittleBirdie- pineapple block

LittleBirdie- pineapple block


As you can see, I chose to use some of my made-up fabric that I’ve put together from scraps, and contrast that with a texty-type cream fabric. This fabric actually has a print resembling vintage dress patterns all over it, with little bits of green here and there.
I cut strips out of both to use with a paper foundation. I obtained the foundation paper from the Generations Quilt Patterns site, where you can print off either 6″ or 8″ blocks. The instructions are also there for how to make the block, as well as cutting instructions for the strips you need.
pine1
I didn’t actually follow those exactly, but instead used another method of paper-foundation piecing that I prefer. You first cut the middle square and a strip to add to that to start the first round. You then use a small card to help you fold the foundation paper back over against the straight edge of the card.
pine5
pine6
Take a ‘Add a quarter Inch’ ruler that has a little ridge along it at the 1/4″ mark and hold it against the folded fabric and card. It snuggles in nicely against the card. You can then cut the fabric pieces underneath with a quarter-inch seam allowance.
pine-page
When you go to add the next strip, you just have to line the edge of that strip against the cut edge of the partial block and flip it over and sew on the marked line.
pine9
Cut off the tail of the strip and use for the next piece. This also avoids having to cut exact lengths of the strips.
You then just go around the block in number order, sewing exactly on the lines of each piece. Use a smaller stitch length, e.g. 1.6, so it makes it easier to peel the paper away later.
pine10
This is what the back of the block looks like.
pine12
I also chose to only put the coloured pieces at diagonal corners. Usually, the coloured piece would alternate with the cream strips, and therefore there would be colour pieces going out to each corner like in a cross, but I had seen a picture somewhere with a striking pattern created when all the blocks are joined and just that diagonal colour stripe going through the quilt top.
LittleBirdie- pineapple block

LittleBirdie- pineapple block


Having said that though, I’m not sure if it was the right decision? or even if my choice of fabrics was the best? I like the finished block but you need to have a lot of blocks to put together so you can play around with the secondary patterns you might create. And, making this one block took me the better part of today! So the jury is still out on what I’ll do next with this- satisfied the itch though, for a little while :)